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Organizational Behavior

Attitude Adjustment
9 months ago

Attitude Adjustment

By  •  Creativity

The most disgruntled employees can sometimes be the best at creatively solving workplace problems — provided they have managers who value innovation and who give them the freedom to defy standard operating procedures.

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Moral Compass
10 months ago

Moral Compass

By  •  Business Ethics

Are ethical leaders developed by training or just drawn that way? In a study of moral choice in the workplace, Rice professors Erik Dane and Scott Sonenshein argue that ethical expertise oftentimes is a teachable skill.

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Heard It Through The Grapevine
11 months ago

Heard It Through The Grapevine

By  •  Organizational Behavior

Innovation is a team sport. We know that creative workplaces represent a series of social networks, each brimming with useful ideas and expertise. But what exactly is the link between creativity and the hive of direct and indirect contacts in an employee’s cellphone?

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Hive Mind
11 months ago

Hive Mind

By  •  corporate culture

For entrepreneurs, the need for self-improvement is obvious: you’re either getting better at what you do, or you’re getting beaten by someone else. The vast majority of other workers, those who draw a paycheck from an employer, also crave self-improvement. But who decides what that improvement looks like?

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Perfect Match
11 months ago

Perfect Match

By  •  Human Resources

Hiring the right employee is one of the knottiest tasks that managers face. When it goes wrong, the consequences can be as miserable as an ill-starred marriage. Professor Fred Oswald describes the hiring principles that are known to work – and the parts of hiring that will always remain a mystery.

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Map Quest
1 year ago

Map Quest

By  •  Strategy

Asking questions to the point of absurdity is a sound business strategy. The process is called issue-mapping, and in a new book Arnaud Chevallier argues that decision-makers who have time and energy to pursue ideas that seem laughable can find the most sensible solutions.

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Just The Facts
1 year ago

Just The Facts

By  •  Science and Society

Scientists have a responsibility to get their message to the community in a clear, accessible form. However, scientists often avoid describing their work directly to the public. Healthy societies and good science should have a symbiotic relationship

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Can You Hear Me Now?
2 years ago

Can You Hear Me Now?

By  •  Customer Service

Ever since the first innkeeper served the first traveler, service providers have amused each other with stories about clients. Those stories are actually even more valuable up in the C-suite, write professors G. Anthony Gorry and Robert A. Westbrook. Gathered carefully, customer narratives boost service, prompt innovation and feed a healthy corporate culture.

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Seat Of Power
2 years ago

Seat Of Power

By  •  Workplace

It’s a paradox. When clients give autonomy to service workers, the workers get more creative and perform better. Managers can help this happy dynamic, Professor Jing Zhou says, by being less controlling of their employees – and by gently urging clients to respect the workers’ judgment.

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Crazy Like A Fox
2 years ago

Crazy Like A Fox

By  •  Negotiations

With negotiations, purely hard-nosed negotiation doesn’t work as well as alternating toughness with positivity. Negotiators faced with mood swings feel a loss of control and will make greater concessions. While, emotional approaches that win concessions in short-term negotiations may not work in the long term.

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Too Much Of A Good Thing
2 years ago

Too Much Of A Good Thing

By  •  Human Resources

Human Resources: Companies are often right to assume that a worker with more of a certain appealing trait will perform better. But new research suggests that the personality/performance link might not always be straightforward.

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Money Talks
2 years ago

Money Talks

By  •  Organizational Behavior

Businesses are more proactive than ever about social issues like diversity, discrimination and the environment. To understand what they’re advocating—and why—start by studying their workers.

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Heavy Losses
2 years ago

Heavy Losses

By  •  Workplace Discrimination

Over the past few decades, U.S. obesity rates have spiked. So has discrimination toward heavy people. Research about this prejudice abounds, but it centers on overweight women and overlooks overweight men. New research shows that obese males face significant discrimination in retail settings, both as clients and employees.

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Why One Selfie Isn’t Enough
2 years ago

Why One Selfie Isn’t Enough

By  •  Workplace Psychology

Managers should strive to understand employees’ current and alternative selves. For better or worse, these alternative selves help shape job satisfaction, commitment and motivation

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The Good, The Bad And The Ambivalent
2 years ago

The Good, The Bad And The Ambivalent

By  •  Workplace Psychology

A mood may not interrupt thought processes the way that a strong emotion does, but it can color workers’ day-to-day life in a profound way. Positive moods can signal that all is well and encourage thought processes that are less systematic and more expansive. Negative moods warn that our situation is problematic and encourage cautious, analytical thinking. Both are obviously valuable in an organization, as they encourage employees to approach problems from multiple perspectives.

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Can We Talk? How Religion Matters In Organizational Life
2 years ago

Can We Talk? How Religion Matters In Organizational Life

By  •  Faith and Work

As scholars rise to the challenge of broaching this largely taboo topic, managers and organizational leaders too can benefit by better understanding both the positive and negative outcomes of religion at work.

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Maybe Clothes Do Make The Man (And Woman)
2 years ago

Maybe Clothes Do Make The Man (And Woman)

By  •  Workplace Psychology

Clothes in the workplace hold important sway over how others perceive us. It is shown that people who wear formal clothes are considered more intelligent, or more skilled, or more competent. In the work place, consider the self-perceptions needed to spark a particular kind of performance when choice dress codes and attire.

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Know Thyself … But Just Where Is That “Self” Located?
2 years ago

Know Thyself … But Just Where Is That “Self” Located?

By  •  Workplace Psychology

Leadership speeches, entrepreneurial pitches, or marketing materials that invoke the heart or the brain could be differentially persuasive, depending on the recipient’s perceived location of the self.

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Happy Place
3 years ago

Happy Place

By  •  Worker Well-being

Workplace well-being seems dependent on gyms, yoga, juice bars as twenty-first century businesses compete for the freshest way to amuse and refresh their employees. At the same time, a cottage industry of scholarly research is advising them on how to do it. Despite the healthy quantity of literature on worker happiness, however, scholars typically overlook some integral issues: pay and job security.

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When Clients Just Don’t Understand
3 years ago

When Clients Just Don’t Understand

By  •  Client Management

Get out from behind the professional curtain and start talking with your clients as soon as possible. Give them an overview of what you do, how you do it, and why is valuable. When you can, let them watch you do some of your work so that they can see for themselves how complex and specialized it is. And perhaps most importantly, connect with them as people, not just as clients.

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Don’t Mind If I Do
3 years ago

Don’t Mind If I Do

By  •  Workplace Psychology

While some people may simply be more mindful than others, evidence exists that mindfulness can be enhanced through practice, training and experience. Meditation-based programs such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, for example, may help employees focus attention on the present. With the empirical evidence of positive work outcomes associated with mindfulness now in hand, managers should continue to be mindful of this emerging scholarship as other important organizational outcomes and workplace contexts are examined.

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Is Necessity Truly The Mother Of Invention?
3 years ago

Is Necessity Truly The Mother Of Invention?

By  •  Resource Management

Creativity can be fostered in a variety of resource environments. It’s the specific actions of managers and employees that foster creativity.

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