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Psychology

Guilty Pleasures
10 months ago

Guilty Pleasures

By  •  Human Behavior

Research that focuses on self-control as a general trait ignores the fact that people are more tempted by certain behaviors, such as smoking, drinking, overeating or overspending. To craft useful public policy that reduces harmful behaviors, Rice researchers say studies of self-control need to be more specific about the types of behavior they’re targeting.

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Take Your Medicine
10 months ago

Take Your Medicine

By  •  Health Care

Would you recommend your doctor to a friend? How do you feel about your medical care? Professor Robert A. Westbrook shows why treating all patients like respected clients makes them healthier.

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Alumni Club
10 months ago

Alumni Club

By  •  Financial Markets

If you’re a mutual fund manager, school connections with a CEO can have an excellent effect on your investments. School ties, research shows, are good for connected investors and even better for CEO salaries. But are they good for everyone else?

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Letter Of The Law
11 months ago

Letter Of The Law

By  •  Workplace Psychology

Critics of anti-discrimination laws often argue that you can’t legislate fairness. Actually, you can, Rice Business Professor Mikki Hebl says. Research shows that anti-discrimination laws protecting LGBT workers’ rights work on several levels at the same time, warning workers about cause and effect, and making a statement about social norms.

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In Advertising We Trust
11 months ago

In Advertising We Trust

By  •  Voter behavior

There’s a reason candidates spend so much money on TV commercials. Officials make policy, but voters make elected officials. The amount of candidate information voters get – accurate or not – helps predict if they will have the initiative to vote, the savvy to vote split ticket rather than party line, and the confidence to skip a vote on just one unfamiliar race rather than skipping out on voting altogether.

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Perfect Match
11 months ago

Perfect Match

By  •  Human Resources

Hiring the right employee is one of the knottiest tasks that managers face. When it goes wrong, the consequences can be as miserable as an ill-starred marriage. Professor Fred Oswald describes the hiring principles that are known to work – and the parts of hiring that will always remain a mystery.

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Wheel of Fortune
1 year ago

Wheel of Fortune

By  •  Personal Finance

Personal savings: Americans who based their savings on a cyclical time orientation had a 78 percent higher savings rate than those who followed a more traditional Western orientation.

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Holding Out For A Hero
1 year ago

Holding Out For A Hero

By  •  Ethics

Of the three types of moral leader, it is really the moral champions that companies need the most. Saints, uplifting as they sound, seldom are financially good for business. Heroes, meanwhile, are rarely called for. Moral champions, however, can be positive and powerful – and nearly as hard to find.

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Map Quest
1 year ago

Map Quest

By  •  Strategy

Asking questions to the point of absurdity is a sound business strategy. The process is called issue-mapping, and in a new book Arnaud Chevallier argues that decision-makers who have time and energy to pursue ideas that seem laughable can find the most sensible solutions.

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Trust Me On This
1 year ago

Trust Me On This

By  •  Lending

Lenders are more likely to fully fund loans and give better interest rates to borrowers they perceive as trustworthy. Moreover, appearance-based judgments of trustworthiness are usually accurate: borrowers who look more trustworthy really are more likely to repay loans.

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A Marathon, Not A Sprint
2 years ago

A Marathon, Not A Sprint

By  •  Personal Savings

Build up those personal saving muscles, by routinely placing a chunk of your paycheck into a savings account, and jog, slowly but steadily, every day. It’s a marathon, not a sprint.

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Compliments Of The Chef
2 years ago

Compliments Of The Chef

By  •  Competition

Competition historically has been seen as a recipe for sabotage and aggression in business. But a group of big-city food truck vendors discovered that cooperation, high standards and really great dishes brought their competition a different flavor.

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Follow The Money
2 years ago

Follow The Money

By  •  Advertising

When local firms spend big on advertising, they influence media coverage. For firms with headquarters near local papers, this increased coverage boosts stock market valuations. Local media give local investors disproportionately positive but not necessarily accurate information about the value of locally headquartered firms.

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Great Expectations
2 years ago

Great Expectations

By  •  Reputation Management

Loyalty in regards to donor giving is influenced by reputation of school and donor identification in regards to the school.

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Crazy Like A Fox
2 years ago

Crazy Like A Fox

By  •  Negotiations

With negotiations, purely hard-nosed negotiation doesn’t work as well as alternating toughness with positivity. Negotiators faced with mood swings feel a loss of control and will make greater concessions. While, emotional approaches that win concessions in short-term negotiations may not work in the long term.

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Big Boys And Girls Do Cry
2 years ago

Big Boys And Girls Do Cry

By  •  Emotions in Leadership

Traditional option of stonewalling may no longer serve companies, since outside perception of leaders is strongly shaped by the emotions they display. In the case of a product recall, a leader who shows a human range of emotions, or simply the “soft” emotion of sorrow, paradoxically comes off as more powerful.

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All In The Family
2 years ago

All In The Family

By  •  Family-Owned Business

Family firms conduct mergers and acquisitions and invest less in research and development than their non-family counterparts. While families can seem inscrutable from the outside, most run on some kind of economic system, which includes family prestige, emotional attachment to the firm or the legacy of a multigenerational link to the firm. The currency just includes more than money.

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Long-Term Partners
2 years ago

Long-Term Partners

By  •  Investment Banking

Before we relied on computers and the internet to learn, we based decisions on our fellow primates’ actions, narratives and visual cues. When the decisions are big, it seems our brains are still programmed this way, choosing to chew data over a business lunch in addition to compiling, analyzing and synthesizing it in two dimensions.

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Love At First Sight Isn’t Enough
2 years ago

Love At First Sight Isn’t Enough

By  •  Business Partnerships

Successful partnerships with other companies, requires being nice, open and getting acquainted. The best modern business alliances, in other words, share traits with aristocratic marriages. Social bonds may not be the first priority for the union, but in the end they can transcend economic interests, and ultimately make the business more powerful.

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Heavy Losses
2 years ago

Heavy Losses

By  •  Workplace Discrimination

Over the past few decades, U.S. obesity rates have spiked. So has discrimination toward heavy people. Research about this prejudice abounds, but it centers on overweight women and overlooks overweight men. New research shows that obese males face significant discrimination in retail settings, both as clients and employees.

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The Good, The Bad And The Ambivalent
2 years ago

The Good, The Bad And The Ambivalent

By  •  Workplace Psychology

A mood may not interrupt thought processes the way that a strong emotion does, but it can color workers’ day-to-day life in a profound way. Positive moods can signal that all is well and encourage thought processes that are less systematic and more expansive. Negative moods warn that our situation is problematic and encourage cautious, analytical thinking. Both are obviously valuable in an organization, as they encourage employees to approach problems from multiple perspectives.

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Can We Talk? How Religion Matters In Organizational Life
2 years ago

Can We Talk? How Religion Matters In Organizational Life

By  •  Faith and Work

As scholars rise to the challenge of broaching this largely taboo topic, managers and organizational leaders too can benefit by better understanding both the positive and negative outcomes of religion at work.

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Maybe Clothes Do Make The Man (And Woman)
2 years ago

Maybe Clothes Do Make The Man (And Woman)

By  •  Workplace Psychology

Clothes in the workplace hold important sway over how others perceive us. It is shown that people who wear formal clothes are considered more intelligent, or more skilled, or more competent. In the work place, consider the self-perceptions needed to spark a particular kind of performance when choice dress codes and attire.

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Know Thyself … But Just Where Is That “Self” Located?
2 years ago

Know Thyself … But Just Where Is That “Self” Located?

By  •  Workplace Psychology

Leadership speeches, entrepreneurial pitches, or marketing materials that invoke the heart or the brain could be differentially persuasive, depending on the recipient’s perceived location of the self.

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Happy Place
3 years ago

Happy Place

By  •  Worker Well-being

Workplace well-being seems dependent on gyms, yoga, juice bars as twenty-first century businesses compete for the freshest way to amuse and refresh their employees. At the same time, a cottage industry of scholarly research is advising them on how to do it. Despite the healthy quantity of literature on worker happiness, however, scholars typically overlook some integral issues: pay and job security.

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Don’t Mind If I Do
3 years ago

Don’t Mind If I Do

By  •  Workplace Psychology

While some people may simply be more mindful than others, evidence exists that mindfulness can be enhanced through practice, training and experience. Meditation-based programs such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, for example, may help employees focus attention on the present. With the empirical evidence of positive work outcomes associated with mindfulness now in hand, managers should continue to be mindful of this emerging scholarship as other important organizational outcomes and workplace contexts are examined.

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Clean Living
3 years ago

Clean Living

By  •  Workplace Psychology

Disgust can be a powerful self-protective force — but it can lead to unethical behavior. When people are disgusted, they’re more likely to act in self-serving ways, like lying and cheating. Making them feel cleaner seems to clean up their act.

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Risky Business
4 years ago

Risky Business

By  •  Online Communities

It seems clear that consumer participation in online communities is here to stay, so managers who sponsor such communities should develop strategies that minimize the potential harm for consumers. In the long run alerting customers about their susceptibility to riskier decisions, would not only help consumers but also help firms safeguard and sustain both their communities and their brands.

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Keeping Up With The Joneses
4 years ago

Keeping Up With The Joneses

By  •  Recessions

Managers should understand how and why consumers buy their products and services, especially when recession looms near. However, high-priced items aren’t the only ones for which spending could plummet should the economy take a dip.

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Express Lane
4 years ago

Express Lane

By  •  Inventory Management

Curbing short sales does indeed alter stock values. When curbs on short selling are removed, the price of overvalued stocks tends to drop. Loosening those rules leads to lower prices, which in turn prompt firms to alter investment and financing choices.

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Is There A Secret Sauce To Customer Communities?
4 years ago

Is There A Secret Sauce To Customer Communities?

By  •  Virtual Communities

If you want to boost participation in a customer community, don’t just build it. Invite them to come. But, be sure to temper your expectations regarding how participation will create immediate value for your firm.

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Doctors, Drugs And Damaging Information
4 years ago

Doctors, Drugs And Damaging Information

By  •  Health Care

People update their beliefs for new medication based on various information sources, but the information they receive is often biased and, on the whole, contradictory. Negative information is not clear-cut, people with high levels of experience, expertise and self-efficacy are less affected because these traits improve their ability to discern the nature and quality of biased information.

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No Pain, No Gain
4 years ago

No Pain, No Gain

By  •  New Product Marketing

When the going gets tough, first-timer product users often walk away. Marketers need to offer training and encouragement to convince consumers to hang on for the ride.

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